questions on nurse's song

In what ways do the associations with green reinforce the emphasis on growth and freedom in the children's play and nurse's response? And we cannot go to sleep; And then go home to bed Fading light - Unlike The Ecchoing Green, the darkness appears much earlier in Nurse's Song. Amended accordingly. Its awesome.. thank you very much. Nurse's Song (Innocence) poem by William Blake. "Songs of Innocence and of Experience “Nurse’s Song” (Song of Experience) Summary and Analysis". Songs of Innocence and of Experience study guide contains a biography of William Blake, literature essays, a complete e-text, quiz questions, major themes, characters, and a full summary and analysis. Do NOT follow this link or you will be banned from the site. Worth noting as well is the idea that this poem ends with what, for the first time, is not a perfect ABAB rhyme scheme since “echoed” would only rhyme with “bed” if you extend “echoed” to pronounce the “ed” sound at the end. Not affiliated with Harvard College. The nurse finds happiness in the sounds and glee of the children, and he or she permits them to continue playing when they request more time before having to return home. View our essays for Songs of Innocence and of Experience…, Introduction to Songs of Innocence and of Experience, Songs of Innocence and of Experience Bibliography, View the lesson plan for Songs of Innocence and of Experience…, Read the E-Text for Songs of Innocence and of Experience…, View Wikipedia Entries for Songs of Innocence and of Experience…. Night has come, and as can be expected from a rational adult, the nurse knows the practical thing to do is to end the games the children had relished in during the daytime. What did Blake mean by 'Innocence' and 'Experience'? They were common land. Explore two sorts of relationship either by comparing a pair of poems or by ranging across the whole collection. Only if one pushes boundaries to their fullest, like extending “echoed” until the very last letter, is conclusiveness found in the stanza to match the previous ones. That she reflects upon missed pleasures suggests that the secretive children are in fact adolescents becoming aware of their own sexuality, a theme in keeping with the overall tone of Songs of Experience. However, I would like to point out that I think the Nurse’s Song is written in an ABCB rhyme scheme, rather than ABAB, as suggested here. I can’t believe this site is much, much worthier than the one’s I’ve seen and is also accessible. Picture: Getty The first lines echo the "Nurse's Song" from Songs of Innocence, but there the similarities end. This is only a short answer space but I can make a general comment. Village greens were not owned by anyone. This differentiation of argument could be a number of things. ‘Then come home, my children, the sun is gone down, This is a simple notion that seems to reflect the overall message of Nurse’s Song. The Nurse - The image of the nurse is used to represent the caring and nurturing capacity within human beings. Her care does not repress or restrict them; she responds to their needs for freedom and enjoys their capacity for play. This is an important moment of distinction within the poem since it shows a difference in the adult’s actions in contrast to the children’s behavior. Her care does not repress or restrict them; she responds to their needs for freedom and enjoys their capacity for play. In addition to being a poet, he was a book illustrator. Songs of Innocence and of Experience e-text contains the full text of Songs of Innocence and of Experience by William Blake. How do you interpret the Nurse's response in the final stanza? Subscribe to our mailing list to get the latest and greatest poetry updates. Their focus on the livelier things to prove their point, birds and sheep, highlights a child’s nature to look for the most active elements around him or her, while simultaneously mimicking the children’s own merriment. The nurse hears the whispering of her charges in the dell, indicating some secretive activity among the youths. You’re welcome. The adult, contrariwise, is focused on the detail that was as “still” and “at rest” as he or she was told to be in the first stanza. The children focus only on making the most of the daylight. Glad you found it helpful. The language within this stanza shifts into something simpler than what the reader encountered in the first stanza, and that change is reasonable as the nurse is conversing directly with the children rather than in open narrative form. From there, the attention shifts from the children’s actions to go into the nurse’s reaction to the circumstance, which offers a contrast to the liveliness of the children. And a nice spot! It is through advertising that we are able to contribute to charity. WHEN the voices of children are heard on the green, Join the conversation by. Please continue to help us support the fight against dementia. Page Phrasing like “leave off play, and let us away” not only embraces alliteration between the phrasing, but it sounds endearing in a way that feels like it’s custom made for children. Copyright © 1999 - 2020 GradeSaver LLC. Connie L. Smith spends a decent amount of time with her mind wandering in fictional places. The stanza finishes with a promise of later play, proving that the nurse has no intention of keeping the children from their merriment beyond the very adult mentality of bringing them indoors after dark. Get an answer for 'Please make comparisons between William Blake's Songs of Innocence and Songs of Experience with reference to the poems "The Lamb," "The Chimney Sweeper," "Nurse's Song… Structurally, this poem follows "The Chimney Sweeper" in its abbreviation of the Innocence counterpart. But this capacity can also be distorted into a desire to control what is carefree and vulnerable. This Nurse is more cynical and seems almost delighted in the wasted day and the impending end of … When the adult sees the stillness of dew, to him or her, the time has come to go home. The poem finishes by returning to the general notion of the sounds of the children’s merriment, bringing the reader on a full-circle journey. This nurse is someone who is with , but not in charge of, her children. Here the prophetic voice of the Bard returns to decry the... Blake's visions have been interpreted as: Blake's visions have often been interpreted as "spiritual visions". And everything else is still. After logging in you can close it and return to this page. Subscribe to our mailing list and get new poetry analysis updates straight to your inbox. For the children, so long as living beings are about, they “cannot go to sleep” as “it is yet day.”, ‘Well, well, go and play till the light fades away, The little ones leaped and shouted and laugh’d, Thanks for reading. Children see things differently than adults, and while adults cannot be children, they can find happiness—and in this case, reason—from a child’s thoughts. About Songs of Innocence and of Experience, Songs of Innocence and of Experience Summary, "The Chimney Sweeper" (Songs of Innocence), "The Little Boy Lost" and "The Little Boy Found", "The Little Girl Lost" and "The Little Girl Found", "The Chimney Sweeper" (Songs of Experience), Read the Study Guide for Songs of Innocence and of Experience…, Wordsworth and Blake: The Plight of Mankind, A Study of Blake's "Introduction" to Innocence and Experience. nice site *-* helped me greatly in my eng exams. While he was not the most well-known of poets in his lifetime, his works have been noted and uplifted by the likes of Williams Wordsworth and Samuel Taylor Coleridge. They are what bring her joy just by being near their joy and laughter. Though the dew has come, there’s still light, and as long as there’s light, it’s still day enough to play. 26 March 2020, 18:22 | Updated: 26 March 2020, 18:26. How do Keats and Blake reflect romantic values in their poetry? resource to ask questions, find answers, and discuss the novel. This Nurse is more cynical and seems almost delighted in the wasted day and the impending end of innocence and childhood that accompanies it. Instead of “laughing” in merriment as the children are doing, the nurse is “at rest” and feels that “everything is still” because of the gleeful sounds the children are making. Sunflower - Language, tone and structure, Ah! Compare the portrayal of authority here with the rule of. She reads too much, likes to bake, and might forever be sad that she doesn’t have fairy wings. Nurse’s Song by William Blake is a description of an unpretentious encounter between a nurse and a group of children who are playing on a hill. And the hills are all cover’d with sheep.’. The poem's rhyme scheme, ABCB DEFE, deviates slightly from the common ABAB CDCD scheme, which suggests discontent on the part of the nurse, whose words disrupt the more simplistic rhymes of childhood. Once more, the nurse is the speaker, and he or she submits to the children’s whims to allow them to play longer. A secondary theme is the nature of childhood innocence. The green - Blake's symbolic village green has three, inter-linked aspects: Using this image emphasises the freedom and play which is at the centre of this poem and suggests, too, the inner freedom of the nurse. And laughing is heard on the hill, "The Chimney Sweeper" (Songs of Experience) Summary and Analysis. An explanation that seems just as likely—maybe more so—is that the children are interpreting the situation differently. However, the nurse is aware of the threat that lurks in darkness (‘the dews of night arise' seems unhealthy) and the need to be responsible in terms of the day to come. They children laugh and such, and that behavior is reflected in their choice of evidence that “it is yet day” as everything they reference is a living—and presumably awake—being. Within this stanza, we find evidence that the children were not, in fact, lying about it still being day because they’re now instructed to “play till the light fades away.” With that in mind, either the nurse has succumbed to their untruth to permit it to stand, or he or she is admitting that the children’s logic held validity. Within Nurse’s Song, the differences between children and adults in regard to thinking is referenced, and the beauty of a young mind is noted. The children, however, are fixated on other details that do not indicate that the day is gone. That the children desire to play as the light fades could symbolise their developing maturity and fading innocence. Copyright © crossref-it.info 2020 - All rights reserved, The world of Shakespeare and the Metaphysical poets 1540-1660, The world of Victorian writers 1837 - 1901, Romantic poets, selected poems: context links, Thomas Hardy, selected poems: context links, Text specific further reading and resources, Nurse's Song (I) - Imagery, symbolism and themes, Attitudes to man and God in the Age of Reason, Introduction (I) - Synopsis and commentary, Introduction (I) - Language, tone and structure, Introduction (I) - Imagery, symbolism and themes, The Shepherd - Language, tone and structure, The Shepherd - Imagery, symbolism and themes, The Ecchoing Green - Synopsis and commentary, The Ecchoing Green - Language, tone and structure, The Ecchoing Green - Imagery, symbolism and themes, The Little Black Boy - Synopsis and commentary, The Little Black Boy - Language, tone and structure, The Little Black Boy - Imagery, symbolism and themes, The Blossom - Language, tone and structure, The Blossom - Imagery, symbolism and themes, The Chimney Sweeper (I) - Synopsis and commentary, The Chimney Sweeper (I) - Language, tone and structure, The Chimney Sweeper (I) - Imagery, symbolism and themes, The Little Boy Lost (I) - Synopsis and commentary, The Little Boy Lost (I) - Language, tone and structure, The Little Boy Lost (I) - Imagery, symbolism and themes, The Little Boy Found - Synopsis and commentary, The Little Boy Found - Language, tone and structure, The Little Boy Found - Imagery, symbolism and themes, Laughing Song - Language, tone and structure, Laughing Song - Imagery, symbolism and themes, A Cradle Song - Language, tone and structure, A Cradle Song - Imagery, symbolism and themes, The Divine Image - Synopsis and commentary, The Divine Image - Language, tone and structure, The Divine Image - Imagery, symbolism and themes, Holy Thursday (I) - Synopsis and commentary, Holy Thursday (I) - Language, tone and structure, Holy Thursday (I) - Imagery, symbolism and themes, Nurse's Song (I) - Synopsis and commentary, Nurse's Song (I) - Language, tone and structure, Infant Joy - Language, tone and structure, Infant Joy - Imagery, symbolism and themes, On Another's Sorrow - Synopsis and commentary, On Another's SorrowLanguage, tone and structure, On Another's Sorrow - Imagery, symbolism and themes, Introduction (E) - Synopsis and commentary, Introduction (E) - Language, tone and structure, Introduction (E) - Imagery, symbolism and themes, Earth's Answer - Language, tone and structure, Earth's Answer - Imagery, symbolism and themes, The Clod and the Pebble - Synopsis and commentary, The Clod and the Pebble - Language, tone and structure, The Clod and the Pebble - Imagery, symbolism and themes, Holy Thursday (E) - Synopsis and commentary, Holy Thursday (E) - Language, tone and structure, Holy Thursday (E) - Imagery, symbolism and themes, The Little Girl Lost - Synopsis and commentary, The Little Girl Lost - Language, tone and structure, The Little Girl Lost - Imagery, symbolism and themes, The Little Girl Found - Synopsis and commentary, The Little Girl Found - Language, tone and structure, The Little Girl Found - Imagery, symbolism and themes, The Chimney Sweeper (E) - Synopsis and commentary, The Chimney Sweeper (E) - Language, tone and structure, The Chimney Sweeper (E) - Imagery, symbolism and themes, Nurse's Song (E) - Synopsis and commentary, Nurse's Song (E) - Language, tone and structure, Nurse's Song (E) - Imagery, symbolism and themes, The Sick Rose - Language, tone and structure, The Sick Rose - Imagery, symbolism and themes, The Angel - Imagery, symbolism and themes, The Tyger - Imagery, symbolism and themes, My Pretty Rose-Tree - Synopsis and commentary, My Pretty Rose-Tree - Language, tone and structure, My Pretty Rose-Tree - Imagery, symbolism and themes, Ah!

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